beqom Study Shows U.S., UK Employees Aware of Gender Wage Gaps but Not of Actions Taken by Employers or Governments to Close Them

SOUTHPORT, Conn.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Despite three in four workers (75%) saying they are aware of gender pay
gaps existing in their country, nearly one in five (19%) admit they are
not aware. More U.S. workers (21%) are unaware of gender pay gaps than
UK workers (17%); among age groups, Millennials (24%) are the most
unaware, compared to 16% of Gen Zs and 11% of Baby Boomers. These
findings are according to beqom’s
The
Gender Pay Gap: What Your Employees Really Think
report, which
assesses enterprise worker perception on progress made in the last year
to improve the gender pay gap in the U.S. and UK and aims to uncover
employee perceptions about pay and identify areas for improvement.

When it comes to preventing or closing pay gaps, employees believe the
U.S. significantly trails the UK, with nearly one-third of UK workers
(32%) saying their employer has announced a commitment to solve the pay
gap compared to 13% of U.S. workers. Additionally, more UK workers (18%)
say their employer has adjusted salaries for female employees compared
to U.S. workers (15%) and more UK workers (24%) say their employer
recently created an internal mentoring/training system for employees
than U.S. workers (19%).

The Gender Pay Gap: What Your Employees Really Think report
reveals that, despite the increased efforts of employers and lawmakers,
enterprise employees believe there is still a long way to go to close
pay gaps, especially in the U.S.,” said beqom co-founder and CMO Tanya
Jansen. “We commissioned the survey to uncover differences between U.S.
and UK employee perceptions, and we found that UK employees are
consistently more likely to say that initiatives to close pay gaps are
working in their country. The gender pay gap is a global issue that
deserves every business’s attention, and we hope that this report sparks
discussions around how to take effective action.”

Additional findings from the report show that:

  • Employees want their governments to solve social inequality issues.

    • When asked which issue they think is most important for their
      government to prioritize solving, one-third of UK workers (34%)
      say social inequality, including gender pay issues
    • Three in five (44%) U.S. workers say health insurance reform is
      most important for government to prioritize, followed by social
      inequality, including pay gap issues (21%).
  • Workers in the tech sector don’t think their employers take closing
    the gender pay gap seriously

    • Less than half (49.8%) of Telecommunications and
      Software/Technology workers believes their employer/manager takes
      closing the gender pay gap seriously.
    • Additionally, Millennials (47%) overall are the least likely to
      believe their manager/employer takes closing the gender pay gap
      seriously, compared to Gen Zs (54%) and Baby Boomers (52%).
  • Pay gap transparency could attract and retain tech workers

    • 37% of enterprise Software/Technology workers say they would seek
      a job at a company that disclosed a lower gender pay gap than the
      company they currently work for.
    • By generation, Gen Zs (70%) are the most likely to say they would
      be more willing to work at a company that discloses its gender pay
      gap figure each year over Millennials (60%) or Baby Boomers (62%).
  • Women are more likely to work for companies that prioritize the
    gender pay gap

    • Women (78%) are more aware of pay gap issues than men (72%).
    • Nearly three in four (70%) women say they would be more willing to
      work at a company that discloses its gender pay gap figures each
      year.
    • U.S. workers (65%) are more likely than UK workers (60%) to say
      they would be more willing to work at a company that discloses its
      gender pay gap figures each year.
  • Employees believe there should be a national law mandating
    companies to disclose gender pay gap figures

    • Nearly three in four (73%) of those surveyed believe there should
      be a national law mandating companies to disclose gender pay gap
      figures.
    • This figure is slightly higher in the UK (74%) where such a law
      exists than in the U.S. (72%) where it does not.
    • Gen Z workers (84%) are the most likely to believe there should be
      a national pay gap reporting law. More than four in five women
      (82%) agree.
    • Three in five (61%) said they are more likely to support or
      advocate for a political candidate or government official that
      prioritizes pay equity.

To learn more about beqom’s The Gender Pay Gap: What Your Employees
Really Think
report and view additional findings, download
the full report here
.

About beqom

Happiness is the best driver for success.

Our mission is to make the workforce of our customers happy. beqom
drives happiness by allowing business managers to lead, align and
motivate employees and partners. beqom’s cloud-based total compensation
platform is used globally across all industry sectors by over 100 large
companies such as Microsoft and Vodafone. It addresses all performance
and compensation aspects such as salary review, bonus, long-term
incentives, commissions, benefits, non-cash rewards and all key drivers
towards Employee Performance Management and Sales Performance
Management. HR, sales and finance organizations leverage our platform to
drive performance, retention, cost optimization and…happiness among
their people. beqom – to make your people happy.

Learn more at www.beqom.com.

Contacts

beqom
Katherine McCabe, +1 408 899 0140
Katherine.mccabe@beqom.com

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